• ILSC 2009 Paper #1001 (Test of a Laser Countermeasure in the Netherlands)

    Test of a Laser Countermeasure in the Netherlands
    Authors:
    Arie KLERK, Ministry of Defense; Den Helder Netherlands
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    In April 2007 the Netherlands Royal Air Force (RNLAF) was host for an extended test of electronic countermeasures on an Apache helicopter. This is an example of Electronic Warfare and the protection against the effects of that. The Northrup Grumman Direct Infrared Counter Measure (DIRCM) uses an infrared laser to confuse the electronics of an approaching heat-seeking missile in order to lead it out of its route.
    Although the laser does not have the power to damage the missile, it would certainly damage the eyes and skin of someone too close to it. That was t...

    $28.00

  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1002 (Reviewing University Laser Safety)

    Reviewing University Laser Safety
    Authors:
    Stewart Robertson, Health Protection Agency; Glasgow Scotland
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    Universities offer a Laser Protection Adviser (LPA) a challenging environment to influence the provision of effective laser safety management. The following are among the reasons for this: lasers are used in rapidly changing experiments and research projects; academic staff and students pursue erudite objectives sometimes without due regard to laser safety and to their detriment; and funding may be limited with a reluctance to spend money on purely safety-related requirements.

    This paper describes experience from auditing laser safety within Scottish Universities...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1005 (Compliance of SLAC's Laser Safety Program with the SLAC Control of the Hazardous Energy (COHE) Program)

    Compliance of SLAC's Laser Safety Program with the SLAC Control of the Hazardous Energy (COHE) Program
    Authors:
    Michael Woods, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Redwood City CA USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    The laser safety program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) must comply with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout). The OSHA regulation covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy could cause injury to employees. Class 3b and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE (Control of Hazardous Energy) consideration. The ANSI Z136.1 laser safety standard provides almost no discussion or guidance on COHE, other than to state that all energy sources associated with Class 3B or Class 4 lasers or laser systems shall be designed to permit lockout/tagout procedures required by OSHA. This paper will discuss how COHE is evaluated and implemented for SLACs Class 3B and Class 4 laser systems.

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #101 (Lasers and Aviation Safety)

    Lasers and Aviation Safety
    Authors:
    Patrick Murphy, International Laser Display Assn.; Orlando FL USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    When laser beams intersect an aircraft's path, a hazard can result. There are four primary types of concern: distraction, glare, temporary flashblindness (for visible lasers only), and eye hazards. The threat level depends on factors including: type and power of the laser, beam path/area in the sky, time of day, aircraft motion and distance, flight phase, pilot workload and pilot awareness of laser hazards. There are two primary ways to minimize or eliminate these hazards: careful and responsible laser use to avoid aircraft, and pilot knowledge of procedures to follow in ...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #102 (Atmospheric Scintillation Considerations for Outdoor Laser Safety Evaluation -- A Statistical Approach for Estimating the Effect of Atmospheric Scintillation on Optical Gain)

    Atmospheric Scintillation Considerations for Outdoor Laser Safety Evaluation -- A Statistical Approach for Estimating the Effect of Atmospheric Scintillation on Optical Gain
    Authors:
    Paul Sorensen, Northrop Grumman; Rolling Meadows IL USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    Mathematical models are available to characterize the behavior of atmospheric scintillation, although with sparse treatment in the application to laser safety. Existing laser safety standards either lack specific applications, or offer only a partial, although worst-case approach. Worst-case assumptions are common, and even encouraged, in safety evaluations. However, the goal of any safety evaluation should consider a balance between ope...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1101 (Unique Laser Safety Applications in Forensic Science)

    Unique Laser Safety Applications in Forensic Science
    Authors:
    Candace Soles, Coherent, Inc.; Santa Clara CA USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    Lasers are known as a superior light-source tool the forensics community uses to identify trace evidence. Lasers are slowly replacing commonly-used filtered lamps, primarily because of a new generation of portable, compact, low-power consumption lasers such as Coherents TracER. TracER, and lasers like TracER, have the ability to detect latent fingerprints, bone fragments, skin, and traces of body fluids. The mechanism by which the laser can reveal trace evidence is known as fluorescence, either inherent in the material or induced by treatment of the mat...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1102 (Laser Safety for the Experimental Halls at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS))

    Laser Safety for the Experimental Halls at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)
    Authors:
    Michael Woods, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Redwood City CA USA
    Perry Anthony, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Menlo Park CA USA
    Ken Barat, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab; Berkeley CA USA
    Sasha Gilevich, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Menlo Park CA USA
    Greg Hays, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Menlo Park CA USA
    William E. White, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Menlo Park CA USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    The LCLS at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will be the worlds first source of an intense hard x-ray laser beam, generating x-rays with wavelenths of 1nm and pulse durations less than 100fs. The ultrafast X-ray pulses will be used in pump-probe experiments to take stop-motion pictures of atoms and molecules in motion with pulses powerful enough to make images of single molecules, enabling scientists to elucidate fundamental processes of chemistry and biology. In 2009, LCLS will deliver beam to the Atomic Molecular and Optical (AMO) Experiment, located in one of 3 x-ray hutches in the Near Experimental Hall (NEH). The NEH includes a centralized laser hall, containing up to three class IV laser systems, 3 x-ray hutches for experiments and vacuum transport tubes for delivering laser beams to the hutches. The main components of the NEH Laser System are a Ti:sapphire oscillator, a Regen amplifier and its pump laser. The main components of the AMO laser system in the x-ray hutch are a pulse compressor, utilizing chirp pulse amplification, and a harmonics conversion unit. Laser safety considerations and controls for the ultrafast laser beams, multiple laser controlled areas, and user facility issues will be discussed.

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1103 (Laser Safety Issues for the 2009 Space Elevator Power Beaming/Climber Competition)

    Laser Safety Issues for the 2009 Space Elevator Power Beaming/Climber Competition
    Authors:
    Darrell Seeley, Laser Safety Consulting, LLC; Wales WI USA
    Dave Marcotte, TRUMPF; Plymouth MI USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    The concept of a space elevator was brought to public attention in part by the well known author, Arthur C. Clarke. It may still sound like science fiction, but with the advance of technology the concept becomes ever more nearly realizable. The space elevator will likely consist of a geosynchronous satellite (22,500 miles or 36,000 km altitude) tethered to Earths surface. An elevator, or climber, will move up and down along this tether, ferrying materials and/or perso...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1105 (Laser Safety on a Large Scale - The National Ignition Facility)

    Laser Safety on a Large Scale - The National Ignition Facility
    Authors:
    Jamie King, National Ignition Facility; Livermore CA USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    With over 500 high-powered lasers being used in activities ranging
    from production optical damage testing/repair to nuclear weapon
    simulation, to laser fusion research, the National Ignition Facility
    (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate is one of the largest per
    capita users of lasers in the world. Throughout the various
    research and NIF support labs, laser safety presents many typical
    and not so typical challenges. Within the confines of the football
    stadium sized, 192-beam, 1.8 Mega Joule NIF, the challenges are
    far more complex, cross...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1106 (NIF Laser Safety Assessment)

    NIF Laser Safety Assessment
    Authors:
    Johnny Jones, Laser-Professionals Inc.; Los Alamos NM USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    During September 2008 an independent and comprehensive Readiness Assessment of the National Ignition Facility was conducted to determine if the facility is in a state of readiness to safely conduct operations. This assessment was performed according to DOE Operational Readiness Review requirements and included a detailed evaluation of the Laser Safety Program based on ten criteria. This paper includes a description of the review process, a summary of the results, and noteworthy practices. The overall finding was that the NIF Laser Safety Program is in complete compliance with...

    $28.00

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