• ILSC 2009 Paper #1201 (Laser Safety Management in a Research Institute)

    Laser Safety Management in a Research Institute
    Authors:
    Shimon Gabay, DGS Laser in Medicine Technologies; Modi'in Israel
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    The laser safety management in a research institute is a complicated business, made of many topics that are supported by mutual interfaces. This paper presents our experience in Weizmann Institute of Science at Rehovot, Israel. The activity in such research institute is characterized by the following facts that require appropriate handling to keep the laser safety on a high standard level:
    1.The laser labs entrance is accessible to the public, where many of them are not aware of laser hazards. - High risk for visitors.
    2.The experimental set...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1202 (Non-beam Hazards of the Ophthalmic Excimer Laser)

    Non-beam Hazards of the Ophthalmic Excimer Laser
    Authors:
    Angela Monks, Health Protection Agency; Leeds Great Britain
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    The excimer laser, with a gas mixture of ArF, is widely used in refractive eye surgery. Over the past decade the excimer laser has become the preferred choice for treatment; the ultraviolet laser beam at 193 nm is able to remove microscopic amounts of tissue from the cornea via a photochemical interaction, resulting in a huge improvement in results from refractive eye surgery compared with previous techniques. The use of the excimer laser for ophthalmic surgery introduces a number of hazards, many being non-beam hazards.

    The non-beam hazards are discuss...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1203 (Revised Non-beam Hazard Section in ANSI Z136.1)

    Revised Non-beam Hazard Section in ANSI Z136.1
    Authors:
    Gene Moss, Corning Inc.; Corning NY USA
    Ben Edwards, Duke University; Durham NC USA
    Tom Tierney, Lanl; Los Alamos NM USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    The ANSI Z136 Non-Beam Hazards (NBH) Technical Subcommittee has proposed revision of the NBH section in the Z136.1 Standard for the Safe Use of Laser. Factors motivating these changes include:
    a) The number of NBH have tripled in the last decade,
    b) NBH tend to incur greater regulatory compliance burdens and consequences than beam hazards,
    c) NBH remain the leading cause of laser related incidents,
    d) N BH can extend beyond the NHZ,
    e) Unlike beam hazards, NBH h...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1204 (Picosecond and Femtosecond Laser Machining May Cause Health Risks Related to Nanoparticle Emission)

    Picosecond and Femtosecond Laser Machining May Cause Health Risks Related to Nanoparticle Emission
    Authors:
    Thomas Puester, Presenter Not Author - Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.; - Germany
    Juergen Walter, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.; Hannover Germany
    Stephan Barcikowski, Laser Zentrum Hannover E.V.; Hannover Germany
    Anne Hahn, Laser Zentrum Hannover E.V.; Hannover Germany
    Juergen Koch, Laser Zentrum Hannover E.V.; Hannover Germany
    Hatim Haloui, Lumera Laser GmbH; Kaiserslautern Germany
    Thomas Herrmann, Lumera Laser Gmbh; Kaiserslautern Germany
    Antonietta Gatti, Universit� Di Modena E Reggio Emilia; Modena Italy
    Pre...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1205 (Lasers in Medicine - Rules, Regulations, and Practices in Managing Laser Plume)

    Lasers in Medicine - Rules, Regulations, and Practices in Managing Laser Plume
    Authors:
    Dan Palmerton, Buffalo Filter; Buffalo NY USA
    Joseph Lynch, Buffalo Filter; - NY USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    The use of lasers for medical and dental applications has grown significantly over the past two decades. Unfortunately, when any type of thermal or ablative instrument, such as laser energy, is applied to human tissue an unwanted by-product is produced which is commonly known as surgical smoke. Through many educational efforts and a number of published standards, it is well documented that surgical laser plume must be evacuated and filtered to protect healthcare workers and their patients ...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1301 (Calculating the Laser Safety Hazard for Scanning Systems)

    Calculating the Laser Safety Hazard for Scanning Systems
    Authors:
    Clinton T. Meneely, Goodrich Sensor Systems; Burnsville MN USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    Recently, many optical systems are employing lasers (indoor and outdoor) to sense objects at considerable ranges over large fields of regard. These can involve powerful wide field-of-view flash LIDAR systems or less powerful, very narrow divergence lasers scanned over the field of regard. Despite the fact that Z136.1 does not directly address scanning laser systems directly (except in a few appendices), there are ways to apply the random periodic exposure standards to various types of scanned systems to determine eye safety and hazard ranges. Th...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1304 (Comparative Evaluation of Ocular Hazards from Projectors-Laser and Lamp Projectors)

    Comparative Evaluation of Ocular Hazards from Projectors-Laser and Lamp Projectors
    Authors:
    Karl Bylund, Microvision; Bothell WA USA
    David H. Sliney, Consulting Physicist; Fallston MD USA
    Michael Beard, Microvision Corporation; Redmond WA USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    Projectors of varying technologies have been in use for several decades in home and office environments. These include 35mm slide projectors, overhead projectors, and more recently digital projectors. The trend in digital projectors has been increasing luminance from smaller products. This has been made possible by the advent of new or improved light sources and projection technologies. Results of a com...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1305 (Scanning Audiences at Laser Shows: Theory and Practice)

    Scanning Audiences at Laser Shows: Theory and Practice
    Authors:
    Patrick Murphy, International Laser Display Assn.; Orlando FL USA
    Greg Makhov, Lighting Systems Design Inc.; Orlando FL USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    For more than three decades, the technique of "audience scanning" has been routinely used at laser light shows outside of the United States. Visible beams from CW lasers are projected towards viewers, to put them inside cones, fans and other moving light shapes set to music. Most commonly, accessible irradiance levels have not been measured by operators; instead they have been set by eye to look "OK". Since MPE-level irradiance at the audience is somewhat less bright than de...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1307 (Assessment of LED's Radiation Safety)

    Assessment of LED's Radiation Safety
    Authors:
    Mou Tongsheng, Optical Engineering Department of Zhejiang University; Hangzhou Peoples Republic of China
    Yu Jiandong, Zhejiang University Sensing Instruments; Hangzhou Peoples Republic of China
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    Recent years, LED technology as well as its applications grow very fast, which deserve more attention to the hazard of LED radiation. The spectral integrated radiances are important parameters in hazard analysis of LED radiation. However, traditional spectral luminance meters are not able to be used to determine spectral integrated radiances in accordance with IEC 62471. Therefore, a novel photobiological safety measurement...

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  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1401 (Alignment Eyewear, the LSO's Role)

    Alignment Eyewear, the LSO's Role
    Authors:
    Ken Barat, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab; Berkeley CA USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    There is no direct mention of alignment eyewear in the present Z136.1 Safe Use of Laser-2007 document. The use of alignment eyewear is known by the majority of LSOs for the visualization of visible beams. Especially when one considers the alternative of removing ones eyewear to see the beam. Remote viewing is the superior and safer alternative, but is still not as common as lifting ones eyewear to see the beam. The point of this presentation is by allowing the use of alignment eyewer the LSO is allowing the user to use personnel protective equipment (PPE) that does not lo...

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