• JLA Vol:15 Iss:3 (Steady-state laser cutting modeling)


    Authors:
    Ce´dric Mas
    Re´my Fabbro
    CLFA, 16 bis Avenue Prieur de la Côte d’Or, 94114 Arcueil Cedex, France

    Yannick Goue´dard
    OPTIS, ZE la Farlède, BP 275, 83078 Toulon Cedex 9, France


    We present a global self-consistent model of the laser cutting process where we have taken into account the main parameters of the process that are the laser beam intensity distribution, the thermal phenomena controlling the melt parameters, the fluid, both cutting gas and melt hydrodynamics, and the local equilibrium of the geometry of the cutting front. This steady state approach provides us with different fluid velocities, surface ...

    $25.00

  • JLA Vol:17 Iss:4 (Developments towards controlled three-dimensional laser forming of continuous surfaces)


    Authors:
    S. P. Edwardson
    E. Abed
    P. French
    G. Dearden
    K. G. Watkins
    Laser Group, Department of Engineering, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GH, United Kingdom

    R. McBride
    D. P. Hand
    J. D. C. Jones
    A. J. Moore
    School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, United Kingdom


    There has been a considerable amount of work carried out on two-dimensional laser forming, using multipass straight line scan strategies to produce a reasonably controlled bend angle in a number of materials, including aerospace alloys. However, in order t...

    $25.00

  • JLA Vol:22 Iss:2 (Nd:YAG laser welding of titanium alloys using a directed gas jet)


    Authors:
    Jonathan Blackburn
    Laser Processing Research Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD, United Kingdom

    Chris Allen
    Paul Hilton
    TWI Ltd., Granta Park, Abington, Cambridge CB21 6AL, United Kingdom

    Lin Li
    Laser Processing Research Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD, United Kingdom


    The increasing utilization of titanium alloys in the aerospace industry, a direct result of socioeconomic pressures, has created the need for a production process which can produce high quality near-net-shape titanium alloy components. Keyhole laser welding is a joining technology which could be utilized for t...

    $25.00

  • JLA Vol:8 Iss:5 (A guide to developing a laser standard operating procedure)


    Authors:
    Ken Barat
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A.


    The ANSI Z 136.1 standard requires a standard operating procedure (SOP), however, it does not recommend or suggest a format for the SOP. The goal of this article is to outline, explain and suggest an SOP format that could be applied by a laser safety officer to a varied number of situations and laser uses.

    $25.00

  • JLA Vol:2 Iss:1 (The Clinical Status of Low Energy Laser Therapy in 1989)


    Authors:
    Jeffrey R. Basford
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN, U.S.A. 55902


    Low energy laser therapy has gained varying acceptance as a treatment for a broad range of soft tissue, musculoskeletal and neurological conditions. A controversial, but surprisingly large body of research with cell cultures suggests that laser irradiation can nondestructively alter cellular processes. Unfortunately, animal and human studies are often contradictory and difficult to evaluate due to differing study designs. As a result, the clinical effectiveness of low energy laser therapy remains debatable. Nevertheless, the findings are intriguing a...

    $25.00

  • JLA Vol:25 Iss:3 (Laser processing of nickel–aluminum bronze for improved surface corrosion properties)


    Authors:
    R. Cottam
    T. Barry
    Industrial Laser Applications Laboratory, IRIS, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122, Australia and Defence Materials Technology Centre, Victoria 3122, Australia

    D. McDonald
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia and Defence Materials Technology Centre, Victoria 3122, Australia

    H. Li
    Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522, Australia and Defence Materials Technology Centre, Victoria 3122, Australia

    D. Edwards
    A. Majumdar
    Defence Science and T...

    $25.00

  • JLA Vol:16 Iss:1 (Influence of surface preparation and process parameters on the porosity generation in aluminum alloys)


    Authors:
    A. Haboudou
    P. Peyre
    CLFA, avenue Prieur de la Côte d’or, 94114 Arcueil, France

    A. B. Vannes
    Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Ecully, France


    The 4 kW cw Nd:yttrium–aluminum–garnet laser welding of solid solution hardened A5083 (5% Mg) and precipitation-hardened A356 (7% Si) alloys, sensitive to porosity formation was carried out at different welding speeds, under He gas shielding, and for partial penetration conditions, on bead on plate configuration. The porosity formation was examined through observation and evaluation of weld beads, based on x-ray radiography inspection coupled with image analysis, and quantification of gas...

    $25.00

  • JLA Vol:20 Iss:2 (Design and validation of a hybrid laser/water-jet machining system for brittle materials)


    Authors:
    Dinesh Kalyanasundaram
    Gamal Shehata
    Clayton Neumann
    Pranav Shrotriya
    Pal Molian
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Laboratory for Lasers, MEMS and Nanotechnology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-2161


    A unique laser/water-jet (LWJ) cutting head has been designed, built, and interfaced with a CO2 laser for cutting and scribing of hard and brittle ceramic materials. Alumina samples were used to validate the effectiveness of the LWJ cutting head in thermal fracture mode. The results were compared with vaporization mode (focused beam) as well as thermal fracture mode (defocused beam) of air-assisted laser c...

    $25.00

  • JLA Vol:9 Iss:1 (Laser cladding of Al‐Sn alloy on a mild steel)


    Authors:
    Z. Liu
    J. L. Sun
    W. M. Steen
    K. G. Watkins
    C. Lee
    W. P. Brown



    Direct laser cladding of Al alloy on mild steel produces continuous brittle intermetallic FexAly layers at the interface resulting in weak bonding of the clad and the substrate. To overcome this problem, both Ni and Al were investigated as intermediate coatings. Although a Ni coating with a thickness of 70 μm was successful in eliminating the formation of continuous Al‐Fe intermetallics, the bonding at the Al alloy/Ni interface was not strong enough to survive a bending test. A pure Al coating was found to be a better ...

    $25.00

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