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  • ILSC 2007 Paper #802 (Evaluating Alternate Laser Safety Barrier Materials: A Case Study)

    Evaluating Alternate Laser Safety Barrier Materials: A Case Study
    Authors:
    Thomas Block, Rutgers University; Piscataway NJ USA
    Presented at ILSC 2007

    There are a wide variety of commercially manufactured laser barrier and curtain materials available to establish controlled areas and to contain any diffuse or reflected beams produced by laser systems. However, there may be circumstances where alternate laser barrier and curtain materials might be acceptable for certain applications and conditions of use instead of commercially available materials. While the ANSI Z136.1 standard establishes protective barrier and curtain performance criteria, it does not define specific testing criteria to evalua...

    $28.00

  • ILSC 2007 Paper #901 (Laser Operations at the JPL/NASA OCTL Facility)

    Laser Operations at the JPL/NASA OCTL Facility
    Authors:
    Fred Battle, JPL; Pasadena CA USA
    Keith Wilson, JPL; Pasadena CA USA
    Presented at ILSC 2007

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has built and is now operating a state-of-the-art R&D optical communications telescope laboratory (OCTL). Designed to perform laser beam propagation and free space optical communications experiments, the OCTL will explore technologies and strategies to meet NASA's future needs for high bandwidth communications from Earth-orbiting and deep space probes. Laser beam propagation between ground and space is regulated by several governmental agencies. This is particularly applicable to high-brightness, Q-sw...

    $28.00

  • ILSC 2007 Paper #904 (Automatic Aircraft Detection to Support Aircraft Spotters during Outdoor Laser Propagation)

    Automatic Aircraft Detection to Support Aircraft Spotters during Outdoor Laser Propagation
    Authors:
    Brian Smithgall, Image Labs International; Bozeman MT USA
    Keith Wilson, Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Pasadena CA USA
    Presented at ILSC 2007

    Image Labs International, in conjunction with Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed a Sky Sentry system to support safe laser beam transmission through navigable air space in the area around future optical communications ground stations. The system consists of coupled near-field and wide field long wave infrared cameras (to support daytime and nighttime operation) that detect aircraft and other flying objects out to 3.4 miles. Designed to ...

    $28.00

  • ILSC 2007 Paper #905 (Laser Safety in Two Sided Exercises)

    Laser Safety in Two Sided Exercises
    Authors:
    Noam Sapiens, NSLS Consulting; Rehovot Israel
    Gvaram Haglili, IDF; Rehovot Israel
    Ilan Melamed, IDF; Rehovot Israel
    Presented at ILSC 2007

    The use of laser range finders (LRF) in two sided exercises extensively increases the quality of training. Nevertheless, this use was banned due to safety regulations. We have issued a new set of safety orders to allow the use of LRF in two sided exercises. The orders state the use of appropriate safety equipment (glasses) and the restriction of use of magnifying direct view optics. The considerations that lead to this set of safety orders are not trivial. We have required that the risk o...

    $28.00

  • ILSC 2007 Paper #906 (Spatial Effects of Turbulence on Laser Safety Ranges)

    Spatial Effects of Turbulence on Laser Safety Ranges
    Authors:
    Noam Sapiens, NSLS Consulting; Rehovot Israel
    Presented at ILSC 2007

    The effects of atmospheric turbulence on the energy distribution and hence on the safety range of a laser are covered by most military and outdoor laser safety standards. In these standards, a formula for assessing the energy distribution maxima after traveling through a turbulent medium is given. This formula assumes a Gaussian beam in the far field and has no consideration of the effects of the turbulence on the beam geometry. The use of Kolmogorov phase screens to advance the beam through atmospheric turbulence enables an accurate assessment of atmospheric effect...

    $28.00

  • ILSC 2007 Paper #907 (Temporal Effects of Turbulence on Laser Safety Ranges)

    Temporal Effects of Turbulence on Laser Safety Ranges
    Authors:
    Noam Sapiens, NSLS Consulting; Rehovot Israel
    Presented at ILSC 2007

    The effects of atmospheric turbulence on the energy distribution and hence on the safety range of a laser are covered by most military and outdoor laser safety standards. In these standards, a formula for assessing the energy distribution maxima after traveling through a turbulent medium is given. This formula only considers the spatial distribution of the laser energy. An analysis is made to account for temporal effects such as pulse dispersion and repetitive pulses. This is accomplished by using the turbulence structure function. A simplified calculation procedur...

    $28.00

  • ILSC 2007 Paper #908 (Laser Hazard Space on the Earth's Spheroid)

    Laser Hazard Space on the Earth's Spheroid
    Authors:
    Anthony Terrameo, Naval Air Warefare Center Weapons Division; Point Mugu Nawc CA USA
    Presented at ILSC 2007

    A Method has been developed to determine the laser surface danger zone on the earth's spheroid. This method determines where the laser beam cone, defined by the angle , which is half the beam divergence plus the buffer angle, intersects a geometric figure represented by a spheroid that is a good approximation to the shape of the earth. This method is useful to determine the laser surface danger zone on a sea-test range: at the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) Point Mugu, California. In addition, this method can be...

    $28.00

  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1001 (Test of a Laser Countermeasure in the Netherlands)

    Test of a Laser Countermeasure in the Netherlands
    Authors:
    Arie KLERK, Ministry of Defense; Den Helder Netherlands
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    In April 2007 the Netherlands Royal Air Force (RNLAF) was host for an extended test of electronic countermeasures on an Apache helicopter. This is an example of Electronic Warfare and the protection against the effects of that. The Northrup Grumman Direct Infrared Counter Measure (DIRCM) uses an infrared laser to confuse the electronics of an approaching heat-seeking missile in order to lead it out of its route.
    Although the laser does not have the power to damage the missile, it would certainly damage the eyes and skin of someone too close to it. That was t...

    $28.00

  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1002 (Reviewing University Laser Safety)

    Reviewing University Laser Safety
    Authors:
    Stewart Robertson, Health Protection Agency; Glasgow Scotland
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    Universities offer a Laser Protection Adviser (LPA) a challenging environment to influence the provision of effective laser safety management. The following are among the reasons for this: lasers are used in rapidly changing experiments and research projects; academic staff and students pursue erudite objectives sometimes without due regard to laser safety and to their detriment; and funding may be limited with a reluctance to spend money on purely safety-related requirements.

    This paper describes experience from auditing laser safety within Scottish Universities...

    $28.00

  • ILSC 2009 Paper #1005 (Compliance of SLAC's Laser Safety Program with the SLAC Control of the Hazardous Energy (COHE) Program)

    Compliance of SLAC's Laser Safety Program with the SLAC Control of the Hazardous Energy (COHE) Program
    Authors:
    Michael Woods, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Redwood City CA USA
    Presented at ILSC 2009

    The laser safety program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) must comply with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout). The OSHA regulation covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy could cause injury to employees. Class 3b and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE (Control of Hazardous Energy) consideration. The ANSI Z136.1 laser safety standard provides almost no discussion or guidance on COHE, other than to state that all energy sources associated with Class 3B or Class 4 lasers or laser systems shall be designed to permit lockout/tagout procedures required by OSHA. This paper will discuss how COHE is evaluated and implemented for SLACs Class 3B and Class 4 laser systems.

    $28.00

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